Just Life

Unraveled Wednesday | Thoughts on Angels.

My knitting is a blob of purple yarn, soon to become a cardigan for Sam, but right this second, while I’m knitting the shawl collar (on a 24″ circular needle), even I have trouble telling what it is. And I’ve been reading some great books lately. I’m now five books through an audio binge of Ann Cleeves’ Shetland series and I just finished Sarah Bessey’s Jesus Feminist. I owe y’all a major update on what I’ve read, but for today, I have thoughts on angels to share. (because it’s Wednesday, and I’m going to find some way to link up with Kat and friends about the knitting and the books!)

This lovely little book, a recommendation from Sarah Bessey, has joined the pile of books I pull from for morning reading. I had no idea what to expect, but I’ve been delighted. The book is broken into seven chapters, beginning with Unraveling a Season (Early Winter), moving to A Widening of the Imagination (Annunciation) and ultimately ending with Newness of Heart (New Year and Late Winter). This morning I read an essay from the second chapter titled “Angels”, by Luci Shaw. Angels have always fascinated me and I enjoyed Shaw’s dive into the history (from scripture to popular culture). It seems Angels are having a moment … and they’ve been having a moment for thousands of years!

She talks about C.S. Lewis’ Aslan “…angels are not safe (in the sense that they’re not comfortable and manageable), but they’re good … it’s all right for us to fee a healthy respect, even an awe, of angels.” (p. 45)

Can we see angels today? She quotes Frederick Buechner:

People see only what they expect to see … Since we don’t expect to see [angels], we don’t. An angel spreads its glittering wings over us, and we say things like, “it was one of those days that made you feel good just to be alive,” or “I had a hunch everything was going to turn out all right,” or “I don’t know where I ever found the courage, but I did.” (p. 48)

She closes with these words “Be alert for God’s surprises — messengers with messages that will startle us out of our complacency.” and a short prayer.

In the midst of everything that’s happening right now – the big and small, the good and bad, the hard and easy, the dark and light – I find great hope here. Be alert. Imagine.

12 Comments

  • Kat

    I am just immersing myself in book 7 of the Cleeves series… and loving it. My slipper knitting is rather blob-like looking as well at this point!

  • Bonny

    I’ve got hat blobs in progress over here, but bet that your cardigan blob will be done very soon! I’m going to check the library for that book; Madeline L’Engle caught my eye!

  • Carole

    That sounds like a great book for spiritual survival in the winter. I call on the angels to help me frequently and I definitely feel them around me when I ask for them.

  • Margene

    I am not religious, but I think of angels often. I just thought it was my upbringing, but maybe they are near, tapping me on the shoulder to remind me of their grace. I just don’t know.

  • Alexa

    As soon as I have finished being here with you, I know that I am going to go and look up your book :). Nourishment feels more important than ever this time of year – and this year; we can all do with touches of grace and hope in what can feel like confusion, chaos and dimness … Glad you have a means of making something you love in the best way possible for you!

  • karen

    I have squirreled away the ebooks by Cleeves and will start one when I’m current with Gamache series. I cannot wait!!! My reading has been awesome this year and hopefully 2020 will be just a sweet.

  • Patty

    I love that you give me so much to think about Mary. Just learned of a new angel this afternoon. They are there and they certainly care for us…at least that’s what I believe.

  • Lydia

    Angels are definitely among us and in the most unexpected places. Will have to add this to my reading list for 2020.